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Talking about what matters to you.

7 May

Its been a little while since my last post. I have been up to quite a lot. Here are some of these:

  1. Comedy Improv
  2. Product Management
  3. Contact Improv
  4. Capoeira
  5. Usability of things
  6. Walks around the High Park
  7. Influence Strategies

To post or not to post, that is the question

7 Aug

Are you like me? Your blog is turning into a nagging, needy friend asking for your attention all the time. You are supposed to meet everyday even when you have nothing to talk. And your blog posts are turning into small talk, the casual and informal chit chat; “So howz going?” equivalent in websphere.

Blogging introvert or extrovert: Who am I?

I was thinking about my relationship with my blog. Am I suppose to post daily? What should be the depth of my contents? Am I expert (connected into things) enough to talk about something daily? or am I willing to use my blog as a place to crystallize uncooked ideas. What should I do?

Thanks to , the usability master, there seems to be a solution to my woes: write articles, not blog posts.

So that’s what I will do- I will have natural depth in each blog post and let the nature of my exposure to the subject and my need to talk shall determine the frequency of posts.

I might still post these small posts but I would not be compelled into writing daily and hence adding to Internet-clutter. I will try to come up with a little more than a heading and a talkback url for my posts.

the famous author in his non fiction book, “On writing,” described a technique for fiction writing but its very relevant for bloggers as well. Here is the essence of it, my paraphrasing,

“write with the flow, describing as and when the ideas come. Write, till you hit a conclusion of sort. Leave it at that point. Then revisit it later; take the ends that needs to be expanded and do a second round of “going with the flow“. Eventually you will cover the subject exhaustively.

When editing, look for patterns, roadmaps, ideas, unique things. You will often see a structure, a natural progression of ideas. Its almost like the way we talk; it will flow.”

Another way to look at it will to think of a journey on a highway. Its like traveling to side roads and small towns while  I am heading towards my destination. Hence enjoying the ride, seeing the city (subject) in a more natural  “as it comes to me” way.

water flows, wind blows

Action: Put posts that are with some depth and stay away from tendency to post for the sake of posting.

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iPhone Adventure

3 Jul

Before you start hating me, let me clarify, I don’t own an iPhone yet. But waite,  I find this very interesting iPhone owner’s adventure “30 days of iPhone“.

Apple’s iPhone is much more than a phone with iPod in it. It has the potential to become a platform for plethora of new services and products. Business Week recently analyzed the iPhone phenomenon in a very insightful article  “Steve Job’s Revenge.

Tags: iPhone, Trend Watch, Apple, Steve Jobs, Product Management, Businessweek.com

Doctor of Business

25 Jun

Have you ever gone through your life’s plan by dividing them into one year, or five years plan. I did just that.

So what is the best approach to see into future with all the knowledge of today. How to predict about in and about this dynamic environment – you, and your environment all will change over a course of next few months.

Here is what I came up with.

  1. I love to teach, coach, facilitate, and advise. I could do that all while having coffee with friends and be labeled as “talk-wanting” person. I can otherwise do it in an appropriate environment of university, on appropriate subjects, with appropriate focus, and have very appropriate outcome. So while talking in coffee shop, I decided that I am better of going “doctor”. So a doctorate it is.
  2. Hands on business expertise. I want to be a successful entrepreneur. I want to have hands-on experience of actual products, launches, successes, failures, learning, and stories. So having a business is the way to go. So a business it is.
  3. Write or Speak. Magazines, online, offline, video, podcasts, video podcasts, blogs, etc. So blog it is.
  4. Experience – countries, cities, cultures, experiences, people, issues. Italy here I come.
  5. Live with passion. Passion it is. 

 

 

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CRM, revenues and branding

22 Nov

Clue 1: This week started off with a call from my younger brother who wanted to discuss the new CRM position he is interviewing for.

Clue 2: An advertising veteran friend and I get into argument on true definition of M in CRM. He thinks its Marketing while I insist it is Management.

Clue 3: The McKinsey Quarterly discusses “Generating revenue from your call center“. I thought call center, a component of CRM, must have been part of revenue drive of companies. Were we not done  with that back in 90s? I guess may be not.

Clue 4: Finally I got newsletter from insightexec.com talking about CRM for brand loyalty.

If you link all these clues together and seek a pattern, you can predict the whole CRM-universe.

Here is what I think.

We are still learning about CRM; which is good.

We are still confused what really CRM means, what are its components; which is a yellow flag if not red.

Lack of understanding results in inefficient use, or sub-optimal benefits from CRM. Hence we are still ignorant of the true potential of “relationship” with customer. Its a potential opportunity even if our interaction is part of service process. Its revenue opportunity even if that interaction is through a call center.

Finally branding. Branding is not few 30 second spots on TV, or some glossy ads in a magazine. Branding is also how your service rep listens to a customer who has something to say (complaint = opportunity = revenue).

Hence it proves that distance between two points, in a corporate world, is covered in multiple elliptical iterations. We visit the same subjects again but make a little progress towards our final destination during every cycle. 

How to know people’s thinking accent?

18 Nov

This post is part of a series: Thinking Accent. This series is an attempt to explore the existence of our unique thinking style, which we lovingly call here as thinking accent, in each of us. First step was an overview of thinking accent, next is the identification of our own accent and last identifying others. You might say, “why should I care about thinking accent?”. Well, honestly you must. Like old sage advise, “look not only what is being said but also who is saying it.”. It is the “look who is saying” part that has a flavor of unique thinking accents.

 

 

Now that we have some idea about ourselves we can explore how others think. Here are few techniques to identify someone’s thinking accent.

 

How & Why of things:

Umezawa thinks that questioning the internal logic of why things are done a particular way will help understand others behavior. For example, a common practice in Japan is to give kids money as a present, while in North America, people prefer buying a gift. To North Americans, the Japanese way appears impersonal while the Japanese think the child should have a choice as to how the money is spent.

Avoid stereotypes:

Cultures have tendencies, but beware of assuming that an individual conforms to the stereotypes about their culture. Effective way is to treat a person independently of his or her culture. Umezawa points out a common stereotype Japanese have about Americans as being aggressive. In his years of interaction with both cultures he has seen more exceptions than confirmations of this.

 

Stories tell:

According to Corriero, “A society’s humor, newspapers, magazines, and radio will give you an idea about their values.” Another neglected source is the advertisements. “In Australia, for example, practically every second commercial is advertising either beer or sports. This should give us a general indication of what Aussies value,” says Ms. Corriero.

 

 

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Identify your thinking accent?

18 Nov

This post is part of a series: Thinking Accent. This series is an attempt to explore the existence of our unique thinking style, which we lovingly call here as thinking accent, in each of us. First step was an overview of thinking accent, next is the identification of our own accent and last identifying others. You might say, “why should I care about thinking accent?”. Well, honestly you must. Like old sage advise, “look not only what is being said but also who is saying it.”. It is the “look who is saying” part that has a flavor of unique thinking accents.

Here is this part. 

 

Key to understanding others thinking accent is to first understand your own. Here are few ways to identify one’s own thinking accent.

Know who you are: 

Umezawa suggests that introspection is extremely important to identify moral, social and personal values that we are composed of. Talking about our old values and their usefulness in a new environment he recommends, “I think we don’t need to discard any of our old values, just keep them.”  

You are the only one:

Umezawa suggests, “Consider yourself an individual. Culture influences but it does not totally define you.” Considering ourselves independent of our culture would help identify our own uniqueness. Each one of us responds to his or her cultural, social, moral and psychological influences very individually.

Know what is expected from you:

 “You need to have the maturity and ability to understand how you are being perceived and then adjust your words and actions so that you are communicating the right kind of message,” says Angela Corriero, a communication expert based in Toronto, who has helped the South Korean army to effectively communicate with US forces, Ms. Corriero adds, “It’s almost like saying things in a way so that people can hear it through their accents.”   Now that we have some idea about ourselves we can explore how others think.

 

 

 

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